STUDY LINKS MATERNAL FOLIC ACID INTAKE TO AUTISM RISK IN CHILDREN

Youths born to women who took folic acid supplements around the time of conception had a lower risk of autism, even if their mothers were exposed to pesticides, according to a study in Environmental Health Perspectives. Low folic acid levels plus repeated exposure to pesticides combined for a higher risk of autism than either factor alone.
HealthDay News (9/8)

UPDATED FLU VACCINE RECOMMENDATIONS

The American Academy of Pediatrics has released an updated policy statement in Pediatrics reiterating that all youths ages 6 months and older should receive trivalent or quadrivalent influenza vaccines, not the FluMist live-attenuated intranasal vaccine, this flu season. The statement also urges all pregnant women, household contacts and health care personnel to receive flu shots.

SUMMER VACATION LEADS TO FITNESS LOSS IN CHILDREN, STUDY SAYS

Research that included 400 British children found that over the summer, they lost 80% of the fitness they had built up during the school year. The study, presented at the annual Congress of European College of Sports Science, found fitness loss was 18 times greater among children from the poorest families than among those from the most affluent families. The Telegraph (London) (tiered subscription model)

STUDY LINKS MATERNAL VITAMIN D LEVELS TO CHILD'S BODY FAT LEVELS

Children were more likely to have a higher percentage of body fat at age 5 if their mothers had low vitamin D levels when they were pregnant, according to a study in the International Journal of Obesity. Maternal vitamin D levels did not affect a child's risk of incident asthma or eczema, researchers said.
Healio /Endocrine Today (8/11)

STUDY: OLDER TEENS ARE AT HIGHER RISK OF HAVING AUTO ACCIDENTS

Teenage drivers face a greater risk for crashes as they get older, with 34% of high school sophomores having accidents or near misses compared with more than half of seniors, according to a study by Liberty Mutual Insurance and Students Against Destructive Decisions. Three-fourths of high-school seniors report having confidence in their driving skills, and 71% use a cellphone while driving.
Bloomberg (8/2)

DIETARY BEHAVIORS MAY BE TIED TO ACADEMIC ACHIVEMENT IN CHILDREN

Youths who ate vegetables every night scored significantly higher on most parts of a standardized academic test, compared with those who didn't eat vegetables, according to an Australian study. The findings also showed higher writing scores among those who ate more fruits but lower test scores, especially in reading, among those with increased sugary drink intake.
The Age (Melbourne, Australia) (7/29)

MYOPIA RISK IN CHILDREN

Six-year-olds with myopia had lower odds of playing sports, had reduced vitamin D levels and increased body mass index, and spent less time outdoors, compared with those who weren't nearsighted, according to a study in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. The findings, based on data involving 5,711 youths in the Netherlands

LESS SLEEP TIED TO FASTER AGING, STUDY FINDS

Youths with shorter sleep lengths had shorter telomeres, which is associated with faster aging at the cellular level, compared with those with longer sleep duration, researchers reported in the Journal of Pediatrics. The findings, based on data involving 1,567 9-year-olds across the US, showed that every hour less of sleep per night was tied to 1.5% shorter telomere length.
CTV.ca (Canada)/RelaxNews (7/7)

FC MRI SHOWS PROMISE IN PREDICTING AUTISM RISK IN BABIES

Researchers examined 59 infants aged 6 months whose siblings had autism spectrum disorder and found that functional connectivity MRI yielded 96.6% accuracy and 81.8% sensitivity in determining those who would develop Autism/Spectrum by age 2 years. The findings in Science Medicine also showed that all of those without Autism diagnoses were correctly identified.
Scientific American online (6/7)

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