BAD DIETARY HABITS AMONG YOUNG WOMEN TIED TO EARLY BREAST CANCER RISK

Women with the most inflammatory diets containing high levels of red meats, sugar and refined carbohydrates during adolescence and young adulthood were 35% and 41% more likely to have premenopausal breast cancer, respectively, compared with those whose diets had low inflammatory scores. The findings in Cancer Epidemiology were based on data involving more than 45,000 women. NBC News (3/1)

INFANTS MAY BENEFIT MORE FROM HOMEMADE FOOD

Babies who only consumed homemade foods had increased dietary diversity and lower body fat mass at ages 1 and 3, compared with those who ate both homemade and commercial foods and those who ate only commercial foods, according to a Canadian study in the International Journal of Obesity. The findings, based on data involving 65 infants. Reuters (2/23)

BRAIN IMAGING MAY PREDICT AUTISM RISK IN INFANTS

Researchers examined MRI scans from 148 babies and found that 15 high-risk infants had cortical surface area hyperexpansion and brain overgrowth prior to autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis at age 24 months. The findings in Nature also showed that a computer algorithm based on brain measurements yielded 81% accuracy and 88% sensitivity in predicting ASD, as well as 97% accuracy in predicting those who wouldn't develop the disorder.
CNN (2/15), Medscape

MORE THAN 350 GROUPS REAFFIRM VACCINE SAFETY

More than 350 national and state-based health care, professional and advocacy organizations led by the American Academy of Pediatrics sent a letter to President Donald Trump asserting their support for vaccine safety and willingness to discuss scientific evidence on the safety and efficacy of vaccinations. "Delaying vaccines only leaves our nation's citizens at risk of disease, particularly children," the groups wrote.
The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (2/8)

INTERNATIONALLY TRAINED PHYSICIANS IN U.S. PRACTICE MEDICINE SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT

More cautious approach with more tests and longer hospital stays results in lower mortality : A study in The BMJ found slightly lower 30-day mortality rates for Medicare patients treated by general internists who graduated from medical schools outside the US, compared with those who graduated from US schools. Data showed slightly higher adjusted costs of care per admission for internationally trained physicians, but no difference in readmission rates.

25% OF CHILDREN LACK ACCCESS TO ESSENTIAL HEALTH CARE IN THE U.S.

Although more US children have health care coverage than ever before, 1 in 4 lacks access to necessary health care, the Children's Health Fund reports. That's in part because almost 14 million children live in places experiencing health care provider shortages, including 65% of rural areas.
The New York Times

NUMBERS ARE TERRIFYING:

Children increasingly need care for type 2 diabetes, obesity
Insurance claims for type 2 diabetes and other conditions more typically seen in adults rose sharply among children and youths from 2011 to 2015, according to an analysis from Fair Health. Type 2 diabetes claims rose more than twofold, prediabetes claims increased 110%, hypertension claims went up 67%, and obesity-related claims rose 94% among babies and toddlers and up to 154% among 19- to 22-year-olds.
Kaiser Health News (1/12)

STUTTERING MAY BE TIED TO DECREASED BLOOD FLOW IN BRAIN

Researchers examined MRI scans from 62 children and adults with and without stuttering and found that those who stuttered had lower blood flow to the brain's Broca's region, which is involved in word processing, than those without the speech disorder. The findings in Human Brain Mapping also showed even lower levels of blood flow to the brain area among those with more severe stuttering.
HealthDay News (1/6)

RESEARCH SUPPORTS LATER SCHOOL START TIMES

Students at a Hong Kong school that delayed its start time by 15 minutes had improved mental health, fewer behavioral issues, better concentration in class and less tardiness after the time change, according to a study in Sleep Medicine.
Reuters (12/21)

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